Feature Word: Carouse

Definition:

To engage in boisterous, drunken merrymaking.

Description:

16th-century English revelers toasting each other’s health sometimes drank a brimming mug of spirits straight to the bottom — drinking ‘all-out,’ they called it.

German tipplers did the same and used the German expression for ‘all out’ — ‘gar aus.’

The French adopted the German term as ‘carous,’ using the adverb in their expression ‘boire (to drink) carous,’ and that phrase, with its idiomatic sense of ‘to empty the cup,’ led to ‘carrousse,’ a French noun meaning ‘a large draft of liquor.’

And that’s where English speakers picked up ‘carouse’ in the mid-1500s, first as a noun (which later took on the sense of a general ‘drinking bout’), and then as a verb meaning ‘to drink freely.’

Source:

Merriam Webster dictionary

Baptism by Fire

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Definition:

One’s first taste of battle; first introduction to a tough situation.
‘This is going to be his baptism of fire.’
Cassell (1902)

Description:

During the Franco-German war of 1870, Prince Louis Napoleon was first exposed, by direction of his father, Napoleon III, to the fire of the enemy at Saarbruck, the event was called a ‘baptism of fire’
Later, people changed it to Baptism by fire.

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Chauvinistic

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Definition:

a man who treats women with little respect.

Description:

Chauvin was a soldier in the French Army during Napoleon’s time. He was know as the most nationalistic soldier in the French army.
People began to associate his name with nationalism and patriotism.
The Americans later used the term to describe the snobby French who believed that their country was better than others.
It eventually was perverted to the meaning today.

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Apple Pie Order

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Definition:

Neat and orderly.

Description:

‘It looks good, everything seems to be in apple pie order.’
Apparently comes from the French ‘nappes pliees’ meaning folded linen.

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Carouse

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Definition:

To engage in boisterous, drunken merrymaking.

Description:

16th-century English revelers toasting each other’s health sometimes drank a brimming mug of spirits straight to the bottom — drinking ‘all-out,’ they called it.

German tipplers did the same and used the German expression for ‘all out’ — ‘gar aus.’

The French adopted the German term as ‘carous,’ using the adverb in their expression ‘boire (to drink) carous,’ and that phrase, with its idiomatic sense of ‘to empty the cup,’ led to ‘carrousse,’ a French noun meaning ‘a large draft of liquor.’

And that’s where English speakers picked up ‘carouse’ in the mid-1500s, first as a noun (which later took on the sense of a general ‘drinking bout’), and then as a verb meaning ‘to drink freely.’

See Details

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