Feature Word: Marshall

Definition:

an officer of the highest rank in some military forces

Description:

A logical assumption is that ‘marshal’ is related to ‘martial,’ but the resemblance is purely coincidental. Although most French words are derived from Latin, a few result from the 3rd-century Germanic occupation of France, and the early French ‘mareschal’ is one such word. ‘Mareschal’ came from Old High German ‘marahscalc,’ formed by combining ‘marah’ (horse) and ‘scalc’ (servant). ‘Mareschal’ originally meant ‘horse servant,’ but by the time it was borrowed into Middle English in the 13th century, it described a French high royal official. English applied the word to a similar position, but it eventually came to have other meanings. By contrast, ‘martial’ derives from ‘Mars,’ the Latin name for the god of war, and is completely unrelated.

Source:

Merriam Webster Dictionary - Word of the Day

Son of a Gun

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Definition:

A rascal; a scamp

Description:

During 1800’s prostitutes that would come on board the ships would give birth between the cannons. These non-crew members were called “son of a guns”

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Sin

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Definition:

estrangement from god

Description:

Most people think that the word ‘sin’ means that one has done a deed that is evil. The word arose from the Greeks, who used the term when an archer has missed his mark.
So, in essence, the word “sin” just means: “one has missed the mark.”

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Marshall

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Definition:

an officer of the highest rank in some military forces

Description:

A logical assumption is that ‘marshal’ is related to ‘martial,’ but the resemblance is purely coincidental. Although most French words are derived from Latin, a few result from the 3rd-century Germanic occupation of France, and the early French ‘mareschal’ is one such word. ‘Mareschal’ came from Old High German ‘marahscalc,’ formed by combining ‘marah’ (horse) and ‘scalc’ (servant). ‘Mareschal’ originally meant ‘horse servant,’ but by the time it was borrowed into Middle English in the 13th century, it described a French high royal official. English applied the word to a similar position, but it eventually came to have other meanings. By contrast, ‘martial’ derives from ‘Mars,’ the Latin name for the god of war, and is completely unrelated.

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Jeep

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Definition:

a car suitable for traveling over rough terrain (trademarked by Chrysler)

Description:

Most people think of it as a proper word relating to an army styled vehicle.
In fact it does have a meaning “Just Engine and Essential Parts”. Therefore is more of an abbreviation adopted as a word.

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Cold Enough to Freeze the Balls off a Brass Monkey

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Definition:

Really, really cold!

Description:

In the pirate days, the ships were all equipped with cannons. The cannon balls were places upon a holder that were called ‘Brass Monkeys’ Since the metal used to make the cannon balls were extremely different from the metal used to make the brass monkeys, on an extremely cold day, they would contract at different rates (Different metals react differently to temperature). The cannon balls would literally fall off the holder when the temperature drop to the extremes. Hence the term.

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